google keyword planner. How It Works FREE!

One thing that attracts many entrepreneurial-minded spirits to the SEO industry is its dynamic design. Strategies are changing continuously based on each client’s focus and industry, preventing proverbial cookie-cutter practices. so here we are going to discuss Google Keyword Planner

This is especially true when approaching keyword research.

There are many keyword research tools available, and each requires a unique creative focus to produce the best search opportunities.

For this article, I’ll home in on one tool from the internet Mothership that sometimes gets sidelined for SEO due to its ad-based focus: Google Keyword Planner.

Is keyword Planner Google free?

YES, Google Keyword Planner is a FREE Tool. it helps you research keywords for your Search campaigns or SEO. You can use this free tool to discover new keywords related to your business and see estimates of the searches they receive and the cost to target them.

Is Google keyword planner good for SEO?

YES, google keyword planner is one of the powerful tools for SEO.

How do I get Google keyword planner?

o open Google Keyword Planner, click Tools & Settings on the right top corner. And then from the drop-down menu, select Keyword Planner listed under Planning. You’ll then see two options: Discover new keywords – This option gives you new keyword ideas that you can use to increase your website traffic. Read Full Guide

Is SEMrush better than Google keyword planner?

SEMrush vs Google Keyword Planner — in my opinion, SEMrush is more powerful.

SEMrush is a complete SEO package that includes backlink auditing, traffic analysis, and detailed reports. They are known for having questionable accuracy, though. Google Keyword Planner, on the other hand, has very accurate search data, and that’s it.

How to get Google Keyword Planner?

if you want to use the Google Keyword Planner, you NEED to have a Google Ads account.

If you don’t have a Google Adwords account already, you can set one up in a little bit of time.

Next, log in to your Google Adwords account. Click on the wrench icon in the toolbar at the top of the page, Then, choose “Keyword Planner”.

You’ll see two different tools within Keyword Planner: “Discover New Keywords” and “Get search volume and forecasts”.

When it comes to SEO-focused keyword research, these two tools are enough to generate thousands of potential keywords.

Keep in MIND!!!

This tool is designed with PPC advertisers in mind. So there are a lot of features in the tool (like keyword bidding features) that won’t be useful if you’re using this tool to find keywords for SEO.

With that, it’s time for me to show you how to find SEO keywords using each of the tools built into the Google Keyword Planner.

Choose Your Tool

As we discussed above, there are two main tools in google keyword planner

And now I’m going to learn how to use these two tools to help you create a massive list of keywords for your Website SEO.

1. Discover New Keywords

As the name suggests, this tool is ideal for finding new keywords.

As you can see, the field above this tool says: “Enter products or services closely related to your business”.

Quick Note: The value you get from the Keyword Planner is largely based on the information that you enter here. So you want to be VERY strategic about what you enter into this field.

So to help you get the most out of this tool.

Start With Keywords”: These words and phrases describe your business (for example, “weight loss” or “coffee”). This allows you to access Google’s internal database of keywords for different industries.

Pro Tip: You can enter multiple keywords into this field. Just put a comma after each keyword and press enter. For example, if you run an eCommerce site that sells cake, you’d want to enter terms i.e “cake without egg” here.

Now, you’ll see the Keywords Results Page.

For now, let’s dive into the second tool in the google keyword planner: search volume and forecasts.

2. Get search volume and forecasts for your keywords

This feature is only really useful if you already have a long list of keywords… and just want to check their search volume. In other words, this tool won’t help you generate new keyword ideas.

To use it, copy and paste a list of keywords into the search field, and hit “Get Started”.

Filter and Sort the Results

Here’s what these four things mean:

“Locations”

This is the country (or countries) that you’re marketing to. Simple.

“Language”

This is the language of the keywords you want to see information on.

“Locations” and “Language” are automatically set to target English-speaking people in the United States. If that’s your target audience (in most cases it will be), you can leave these options as-is.

But let’s say you’re based in Germany. You’d want to change the Location to “Germany” and choose “German” as the language.

“Search networks”

This is whether or not you want to advertise only on Google… or Google and their “search partners”. Search partner sites include other search engines and Google properties (like YouTube).

I recommend leaving this set to just “Google”.

“Date range”

Leaving this as the default “12 months” is usually fine.

Competition

You can have the Google Keyword Planner only show you keywords with “Low”, “Medium” or “High” competition.

You Can Add More Filters according to your Need….!!!

This feature trips a lot of people up.

Remember: the Google Keyword Planner is designed 100% for Google Ads… not SEO.

So the “Competition” score here ONLY refers to Adwords competition (not how competitive the keyword is to rank for in Google’s organic search results). So I recommend leaving this blank.

Ad Impression Share

Again, this setting only applies to Adwords. So for the sake of SEO, we can ignore this filter.

Top of Page Bid

This is how much you’d expect to pay for your ad to appear at the top of the page for that keyword.

(This used to be called “Cost Per Click” or “CPC”.)

Top of Page Bid is a proxy indicator of commercial intent. So if you only want to target keywords that potential buyers search for, you can set this to a certain dollar amount.

As you can see, there are two options “high range” and “low range”.

Analyze the Keyword Ideas Section

you’ve filtered the results down to keywords that are ideal for your business, let’s break down the terms that are left.

Specifically, I’m going to show you how to analyze the terms that show up in the “Keyword Ideas” section of the Keyword Planner.

Here’s what each of the terms in this section means:

Keyword (by relevance): This is the list of keywords that Google considers most relevant to the keyword or URL you typed into it.

Avg. monthly searches: Pretty self-explanatory. However, keep in mind that this is a range… and not a super-accurate indicator of search volume.

(I’ll show you how to get more accurate search volume data in a minute.)

Pro Tip: Watch out for seasonal keywords. That’s because seasonal keywords (like “Halloween costumes”) may get 50,000 searches in October and 100 searches in May. But the GKP will say that the term gets “10,000 searches per month”, which is kind of misleading.

Competition: Like I mentioned earlier, “Competition” in the Google Keyword Planner has nothing to do with SEO. Instead, “Competition” is simply the number of advertisers that are bidding on that keyword. But it IS useful to see if a keyword has any commercial intent (after all, the more people bid on a keyword, the more potential there is for them to become a lead or customer).

Top of Page Bid: This is another great way to size the keyword’s monetization potential. The higher bid here, the more lucrative the traffic tends to be.

Choose a Keyword

This is tricky.

Why? There are LOTS of factors that go into choosing a keyword. And it’s more art than science.

That said, I learn best from examples. So I’m going to help you choose a keyword from your list by walking you through a quick example.

(For this example I’m going to be using the “Discover new keywords” tool because this is the best way to uncover new keywords in the Google Keyword Planner.)

First, you want to think of a keyword that’s somewhat broad…but also describes your product, service or content idea.

For example, let’s say that you run an eCommerce site that sells organic food.

If you wanted to write a blog post about the health benefits of organic coffee, you wouldn’t want to use the keyword “coffee” (too broad) or “health benefits of organic coffee” (too narrow).

But a keyword like “organic coffee” would work GREAT.

So pop that keyword into the field and click “Get Started”.

how do you know which keywords to choose?

There are dozens of different factors to look at. But, in general, I like to choose keywords based on 3 main criteria:

Search Volume: Very straightforward. The higher the average search volume, the more traffic that keyword can send you.

Commercial Intent: In general, the higher the competition and suggested bid, the easier it will be to convert that traffic into paying customers when they land on your website.

Organic SEO Competition: Like commercial intent, evaluating a keyword’s competition in Google’s organic search results takes some more digging. You need to look at the websites that are ranking on the first page… and figure out how hard it’ll be to outrank them. This guide to SEO keyword competition covers everything you need to know.

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